Tag: what I’m reading next

Reading: April 2018

The angels erupted in song yesterday when I finally put down the book David Copperfield and rejoiced that nearly 900 pages later I was finished. Whew. It was a doozy of a book and the longest one I’ve read in years. I’m so happy to have finished it (and for the most part enjoyed it), but I’m super thrilled to be moving on.

Finished

The Hiding Place: The Triumphant True Story of Corrie Ten Boom
Seriously, the best book I’ve read in a while. This one has been on my “to-read” list for years and when it ended up as one of my book club books AND a book that I’m teaching this coming year I was beyond thrilled. It’s an amazing read for the mere story of it, but also for the conviction of it. When I start to look around and become annoyed or dismayed at my life – all I need to do is remember hers. This one is worthy of it’s own review post.

Reading People: How Seeing the World through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything by Anne Bogel
This was good; not my absolute favorite but I’m not a personality guru either. I really enjoyed the first few chapters, but when she started in on all the different personality tests etc, it didn’t quite hold my interest. It is a great compilation of all the different personality type discussions going on and I do believe in at least being familiar with all the typings as being a helpful thing when trying to deal with people (especially those in your family).

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
To begin with, this is Dickens so it’s crazy wordy. I will say, compared the other Dickens I’ve read this one was definitely more light-hearted. There were places throughout the book where I actually laughed and I did enjoy many of the characters. Dickens is amazing at his ability to create memorable characters and it’s where his love of descriptions is so helpful. By the time you are done with the book you definitely have a very vivid picture in your mind of who is who. I will say the character of David was somewhat annoying. I absolutely loved him as a child, but then it was like he never grew up. From his child-wife to the blindness he carried throughout the book for Agnes (come on already!) drove my absolutely bonkers…and his infatuation with Steerforth! I will say that Dickens did a fabulous job leading up that whole story with Steerforth. I knew from the beginning that at some point David was totally going to realize what sort of goody-too shoes he was.

Caddie Woodlawn (Caddie Woodlawn #1)
The chick and I read this aloud and overall it was pretty good. I feel like it is so much a copy of Little House that I had a hard time getting through that. I don’t know that either of us is a huge Pioneer literature fan so I don’t think we will be continuing on with the series. But it was a good read aloud.

Currently

The Fledgling (Hall Family Chronicles #4)
This is our current read aloud. I picked this up last year when I knew we were going to study birds and we finally started it. So far we are only like 10 pages in, so the jury is still out on how good it will be.

Before We Were Yours by Windgate
My mom passed this off to me a few days ago and knowing I needed something “easy” after Dickens I figured I would try this.

Across Five Aprils
We are attempting to do a family read aloud of this book. It’s been on the list all year and one that I wanted both kids to read. I’ve never read it and the reviews are always great.

Fanny Crosby
This is a pre-read for me as the chick is reading it for school. It’s a biography of her life. She was blind and ended up being this amazing hymn writer; she wrote Blessed Assurance for one.

Island of the Blue Dolphins
The chick is also reading this for school. It was one of my favorites as a child and I’m still enjoying it; she’s not. 🙁

Orthodoxy by Chesterton
This book is making my brain hurt.

What’s Next?

I’m going to re-read Hannah Coulter, because the Circe Close Reads podcast is getting ready to read it in May and I love Wendell Berry so win-win. A friend recommended PJ Wodehouse to me, so I reserved some of those books. Our next book club book is The Good Earth by Buck (I think) so I will need to get my hands on that. I’m also hoping to start reading Steven King’s memoir on writing.

Reading: March 2018

I know it’s nearly mid-April, but I honestly have been spending so much time on the computer doing other things that I haven’t felt like writing at all. I also haven’t been reading quite as much either because of this…

Currently

David Copperfield – this monstronsity is our June book for my book club and I started it way early because I knew I’d never finish it if I didn’t. I really loved the first third, the second third has been a little bit “ehh”, but it’s sort of ramping up again. I go in spurts and sometimes can sit and read it for a while and other times honestly fall asleep. I really do love Dickens, but sometimes his descriptions are so laborious that it’s just too much. But I do love the character of David and he’s so humorous, which seems strange to me as he is a Dickens character.

Reading People by Anne Bogel – I really loved the first couple chapters of this book and then it started going into all the personality types and I got all confused. I get it, but sometimes it all just bogs down in my head and I just wonder if it’s really worth it for me to understand it? But it is a good book and I thing she does a great job of bringing a whole bunch of information into a concise little volume.

Caddie Woodlawn – the chick and I are reading this one at night. It’s pretty good; rather Little House-ish, but kind of funnier in some ways.

Finished

Know and Tell: The Art of Narration – hands down the best Charlotte Mason-ish book I’ve read yet (besides CM stuff itself). Totally helpful and something that I know I will use and refer to tons. I highly recommend it!

What’s Next

I need to start reading The Hiding Place, as that is our next book club book and I want to start reading Steven King’s memoir on writing. But first I’ve got to finish this darn encyclopedia.

Reading: October 2017

Currently

Beauty in the Word by S. Caldecott
This book has been on my to-read list for ages and a sweet friend even gifted me with it months ago. Yet, it sat on my nightstand. Finally, I picked it up last week and started reading it and goodness it’s good. It is written from a Catholic perspective, but the explanations he gives regarding education and learning and our consummate goals are just beautiful. I’m trying to read slowly and digest it all; copying all sorts of great things into my commonplace book.

Johnny Tremain
The chick and I are still slowly reading through this. So far, so good.

The Awakening of Mrs. Prim by N. Fenoliera
This was suggested by a host of people and it’s been so interesting so far. I feel like the writing style is so different, but maybe it’s just the characters? I don’t know. I have a hankering where I think this book is headed, but honestly I’ve been surprised already with some things that I didn’t expect so I’m curious to keep reading.

Home Education (#1) by C. Mason
I’ve finally gotten a copy of at least the first volume by Ms. Mason and I’m super slowly reading through it. I’m in a study group that’s going through volume 3, but for my own education I wanted to start from the beginning.

Finished

The Seamstress by S. Tuvel Bernstein
This was recommend to me by another friend ages ago and I finally got my hands on it. It is a Holocaust story, but one set in Romania, of which I knew very little regarding the story of the Jewish population in Romania. Her story starts with the years leading up to the War and then goes all the way through Liberation. It really is an amazing story of survival.

Number the Stars by L. Lowry
I’ve never read this book and my son needed to read it for his writing assignments so I figured it was high time – since both of my kids have read it multiple times. This is another Holocaust story, but set in Denmark. Again another area of Europe I wasn’t totally familiar with. This time, it is about a non-Jewish family, putting themselves at risk in order to save their friends.

Making All Things New: Restoring Joy to the Sexually Broken by Powlison
Powlison is awesome and I’ll ready anything by him. I feel like he takes a subject that is so hard to discuss – any subject- and brings it back to Scripture so well. This is a super helpful book for those with and without any type of sexual brokenness; which in this day and age pretty much includes all of us.

The Optimist’s Daughter by E. Welty
I’ve never ready anything by Welty (who apparently is the “other” southern writer) and this was on my master to-read list this year. I almost feel like I need to read it again to really appreciate it. It was super well written and the story flowed along like nothing else.

Swallows and Amazons by A. Ransome
Fantastic! We really loved this book and it totally waxes nostalgic for days when kids were just free to do whatever without any fear of anything.

The Kitchen House by K. Grissom
Yet another book that was on my master to-read and it was good. Set in the south on a plantation during the years of slavery, it’s a hard book to read but the storytelling is amazing and the character development was fantastic.

What’s Next

I’ve got a couple of books about the internet that I really want to read: The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains by N. Carr and The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection by M. Harris. I’m really trying to figure out how to manage all the reading, writing and creating I’m not doing because of the lure of the screen. Setting boundaries in the beginning, but in the end I’m so ready to chuck it all. I long for the days when all I did was sit here and blog and write; which honestly weren’t perfect either. Nothing ever is.

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