Reading :: spring/summer 2019

It’s been a while since I did any sort of reading update. I’ve been steadily plugging along, starting too many books and not really keeping up with what I’m reading. It’s been the first summer in like the last 4 years that I haven’t had to do any trainings for upcoming teaching responsibilities, so I feel like my reading life has been wide open. I’ve tried to do a little pre-reading for my upcoming sophomore, but I keep becoming distracted by other books that are more appealing or higher on my list.

Currently

Great Possessions: An Amish Farmer’s Journal by D. Kline. :: I’m not really sure how this ended up on my reading list, but so far it’s been pretty interesting. It does cause to one to harken to the simplicity of a farming life and even the Amish life; especially with all the crazy political junk going on.

Phantastes by G. MacDonald :: I’m reading this because apparently it was one of C.S. Lewis’ favorites. I have to admit it’s rather odd and it might not be the best book to read before falling asleep – partially because it is sort of putting me to sleep and partially because I’m not sure I’m awake enough just before bed to really appreciate it.

Beate Not the Poore Desk: A Writer to Young Writers by W. Wangerin Jr :: This book is awesome. I’ve loved all of it and I really love Wangerin. I’ve only ever read his non-fiction, so the jury is out on whether I’d like his fiction, but I completely “get” his writing voice and love it.

Finding Quiet: My Story of Overcoming Anxiety and Depression by JP Moreland :: I quickly ordered this one when I realized the topic. I’m about halfway through and it has been really encouraging and full of many different ways to combat anxiety attacks. I appreciate his perspective of how the church needs to be in more conversation about anxiety/depression, but also his recognition that sometimes it takes more than prayer and sin confession to overcome this struggle. Medicine is not an evil.

On Hold

I started a few books and they are on hold for various reasons, some because we are on a school break, some because they were due at the library again and some just because I start too many books.

You Learn by Living by E. Roosevelt, In the Land of the Blue Burqas by K. Mccord, The Lifegiving Table by S. Clarkson and Tending the Heart of Virtue by V. Gurolan

Read

Kingdom of the Blind by L. Penny :: I really want to like Louise Penny because I feel like every mystery lover does, but I really am not a huge fan. She’s ok when I’m in the mood for a mystery and don’t have one, but really I just don’t love Gamache and the characters. This one was better than the other one I read, but still not a fan.

1984 by Orwell :: this was a pre-read for my high schooler. He was interested in reading this and I hadn’t read it since high school, so I felt like it was due time for me to read it again. There were some things in it that I didn’t remember at all, but overall it was super scary to read it in these times of history revision/erasure and just all the other lack of individuality (despite everyone crying out for it) and just our inability to respect other peoples differing opinions.

The Clockmaker’s Daughter by K. Morton :: this was another one that had been on my list for a while and another author that people tend to rave over. I really felt like I slugged through the first half of this book; maybe even the first 3 quarters. It did ramp up a little in the end, but man the ending was horrible. I finished this and 1984 on the same day and it was totally depressing. Both of them had super depressing endings.

The Night Gardener by Auxier :: this is a youth book and it’s by the guy that wrote Peter Nimble and His Fantastic Eyes. I really loved this. I had read many reviews that mentioned how good it was and it really was. My daughter was not so convinced.

Becoming Mrs. Lewis by Callahan :: this is the story of Lewis and Joy and was our book club choice for July. It was eh; so- so. There were parts of it I really appreciated and enjoyed and then parts of it that I thought were sort of unnecessary . She really takes license with the love story between the two of them and that kind of made me uncomfortable. Callahan is also a very flowery, descriptive writer so that was mildly annoying. Honestly, romance novels are not my thing so maybe that was my utmost issue. It was a good and interesting story and apparently she consulted a fair bit with Joy’s son and there were many tidbits in there that I had no idea about that were interesting.

The Curve of Time by Blanchet :: this is probably my favorite book so far this spring/summer. I absolutely loved it. It’s the story of a widow living on the coast of British Columbia who would take her children sailing all summer in the area between Vancouver Island and the rugged coastline. It’s a crazy area where the Pacific Ocean tides come through and mix with the freshwater rivers coming down from the mainland. I wish I was a mother like this; wild and free and able to just take off and go on adventures. I’m so not.

Persuasion by Austen :: People had been telling me for years to read this Austen, mostly because Emma is hands down one of my favorite books. This did not disappoint, but honestly I still love Emma.

Next up…

I don’t know what’s next. I really need to get busy and make a list because I know I have tons of pre-reading I need to start for school. What are you reading this summer?

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