Sewing: Summer Camp 2017

This summer I had the joy of leading two sewing camps for kids ages 2nd grade on up. The first week, I had a Sewing 101 camp with two sessions: one in the morning and one in the afternoon. I had two awesome groups of campers and as always I walked away with amazement at the creativity so many of these kiddos had. Here’s a sampling of some of their projects:

Camp 101 : 2017

Learning how to use the sewing machine for the very first time!

Camp 101 : 2017

Making a banner for her room.

Camp 101 : 2017

Camp 101 : 2017

Camp 101 : 2017

For the first year I had boys! They were awesome!

Camp 101 : 2017

Camp 101 : 2017

Fairy dolls and Pirates.

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For a few years now I’ve wanted to try a Fashion Camp, but was super nervous about it. This year I bit the bullet and did it and I’m so glad I did. I had an awesome group of girls and we made so many great things – and all of them came together so well! They were super proud of all they made and I was super excited that everything fit!

Fashion Camp 2017

We ended the week making dresses using Sis Boom’s Molly Peasant dress. I modified it a little bit for our purposes; leaving out the waist elastic. It ended up being an awesome first garment project.

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We made some Purl Bee City Gym Shorts, which turned out so great. This actually ended up being a pretty challenging project with the bias binding, but they did so great. I pre-made all the binding for the girls, but they pinned it on themselves and for the most part sewed it on all by themselves.

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In between projects the girls got creative. They worked together and made a little fruit basket and helped a friend make a family of monsters.

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Overall they both came together well and I looked forward to another summer of sewing in 2018!

Reading: July 2017 + midway update

I’m halfway through the year so far and I’ve done pretty good with my “assigned” reading list. I’ve read about half of the fiction books and I’ve dabbled in the other categories as well. I’ve found myself a little frustrated with some of my choices and I’m wondering if I will end up reading everything. It’s a funny thing when you make a list at the beginning of the year and then life happens and you wonder why one book seemed so appealing to you and then 6 months later it doesn’t?

You can check out where I am on my list here. But for July, here’s what I read:

Currently

The Core by Leigh Bortins
I’m still plugging through this book written by the creator of Classical Conversations (the co-op we are a part of). So far I actually have really enjoyed it. It’s been super helpful to get a more formal perspective on the program and just classical education in general.

A Girl of the Limberlost
Yes, still reading. I’m finding that I put this one aside when I pick up another book and then come back to it. I’m getting there.

Unseen by Sara Hagerty
I’m privileged to be an advanced reader for this book and so far it’s been super good. Definitely a conversation that needed to start in my head between the Lord and myself.

Finished

Dark Enough to See the Stars in a Jamestown Sky by C. Lapallo
This book was fabulous. It was a pre-read for my 8th grader and I had heard rave reviews from friends who had recommended it as a great early American history book and it didn’t disappoint.

Walking on Water by L’Engle
Nothing short of awesome. Such a good book and one I think I’ll read again for sure. After getting to listen and meet Katherine Paterson a few months ago, it’s made me super sad that I’ll never get to hear L’Engle in person. I’ve been searching for recordings of her past lectures or anything and I’ve come up short. I really appreciate her take on art and spirituality and how that all fits together so much.

Abandoned

The Seamstress by F. de Pontes Peebles
I got about 200 pages into this book and just couldn’t keep going. It was such a laborious read and I wasn’t getting the sense that it was all going to be worth it in the end. There were parts of it that were getting a little to graphic for my taste too so I set it aside.

Uninvited: Living Loved When You Feel Less Than, Left Out, and Lonely by L. Terkeurst
Just couldn’t get into it. I think Hagerty’s book, which is a similar idea, is more what my heart needed.

What’s next?

I am still pre-reading stuff for school.  I need to read The Landing of the Pilgrims next and a few other shorter stories for my daughter. I’ve reserved The Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic–and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by S. Johnson from the library and I need to finish all these books I’ve started too. The loose ends are getting to me!

One Thimble: A Little Mermaid Doll

I’m so excited to finally be able to reveal this pattern! It is coming out in 12 days in the awesome One Thimble magazine. But today I can share a little about the pattern so that you can be ready to get your hands on your own pattern as soon as it comes out!

This is a great little project to take along with you – and the perfect little gift for a sweet little one to stick in her pocket!

She comes with a complete pattern for the embroidery and stitching up the little doll and her shell bed. Perfect for all levels of embroidery and hand sewing!

Commonplace {Walking on Water}

Notes from Walking on Water by Madeleine L’Engle:

  • That which is impossible and probable is better than that which is possible and improbable. ~ Aristotle p.15
  • Generally what is more important than getting water-tight answers is learning to ask the right questions. p.15
  • God is always calling on us to do the impossible. It helps me to remember that anything Jesus did during his life here on earth is something we should be able to do, too…If Jesus of Nazareth was God become truly man for us, as I believe he was, then we should be able to walk on water, to heal the sick, even to accept the Father’s answer to our prayers when it is not the answer that we hope for, when it is No. p.19
  • …as though faith were something which lay within the realm of verification. If it can be verified, we don’t need faith. p.22
  • But a God who allows no pain, no grief, also allows no choice…We human beings have been given the terrible gift of free will and this ability to make choices, to help write our own story, is what makes us human, even when we make the wrong choices, abusing our freedom and the freedom of others. p.25-26
  • You must once and for all give up being worried about successes and failures. Don’t let that concern you. It’s your duty to go on working steadily day by day, quite quietly, to be prepared for mistakes, which are inevitable and for failures. ~ Tchekov p.33
  • In a very real sense not one of us is qualified, but it seems that God continually chooses the most unqualified to do his work, to bear his glory. If we are qualified, we tend to think that we have done the job ourselves. If we are forced to accept our evident lack of qualification, then there’s no danger that we will confuse God’s work with our own, or God’s glory with our own. p.62
  • All of life is a story, story unraveling and revealing meaning. Despite our inability to control circumstances, we are given the gift of being free to respond to them in our own way, creatively or destructively. p.105
  • We do not draw people to Christ by loudly discrediting what they believe, by telling them how wrong they are and how right we are, but by showing them a light that is so lovely that they want with all their hearts to know the source of it. If our our lives are truly ‘hid with Christ in God,’ the astounding thing is that this hiddenness is revealed in all that we do and say and write. p. 122
  • Far too often today children are taught, both in school and at home, to equate truth with fact. If we can’t understand something and dissect it with our conscious minds, then it isn’t true. In our anxiety to limit ourselves to that which we can comprehend definitively, we are losing all that is above, beyond, below, through, past, over that small area encompassed by our conscious minds. p.139
  • To pray is to listen also, to move through my own chattering to God, to that place where I can be silent and listen to what god may have to say. But, if I pray only when I feel like it, God may now choose to speak. The greatest moments of prayer come in the midst of fumbling and faltering prayer, rather than the odd moment when one decides to turn to God. p.149
  • One act of thanksgiving made when things go wrong is worth a thousand when things go well. ~ John of the Cross p.156